The Supreme Court is back in session after Hurricane Sandy shut down oral arguments on Tuesday, October 30th. They’re slated to decide cases originating in Florida that deal with the constitutionality of drug sniffing dogs.

The LA Times article on the subject references an experiment conducted by UC Davis. Experimenters told 18 police dog handlers and their drug-sniffing dogs that they “had hidden small amounts of illegal drugs in four rooms of a church.” The dogs alerted their handlers a total of 225 times to the presence of drugs. But in actuality, the church was clean. There had been no drugs (Read the article here).

This raises several issues in regards to probable cause. Are the unconscious (or overt) desires of the handler affecting the dog’s behavior? This study suggests that they do. Car stops aside, SCOTUS is hearing a case that deals with a dog sniff at the front door of a home. The Florida court overturned the conviction of a man who was found guilty of growing marijuana plants in his home after police officers approached his front door and the drug sniffing dog detected illegal drugs. 

The counter argument is that unlike other detection devices, such as infrared technology, dog sniffing alerts only to that behavior which is criminal, since they are trained to detect specific illegal substances. But if what they’re detecting isn’t there, how reliable can they really be? 

What do you think? 

creativemornings:

The millennial social form is the small business.
William Deresiewicz, Writer and Critic speaking at CreativeMornings/Portland  (*watch the talk)

creativemornings:

The millennial social form is the small business.

William Deresiewicz, Writer and Critic
speaking at CreativeMornings/Portland (*watch the talk)

(Source: creativemornings)

breakingnews:

WikiLeaks releases classified US prisoner guidelines
Herald Sun: The whistleblowing website WikiLeaks has released a set of classified US government documents detailing policies on how prisoners in places like Iraq and Cuba are to be treated. It began by releasing five restricted files from the US Depar
tment of Defense, including the standard operating procedure manual for Camp Delta, Guantanamo Bay. Over the next month it will publish in chronological order more than 100 classified documents.Photo: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrives to speak from the balcony of Ecuador’s embassy in London, where he is taking refuge, on August 19, 2012. (Reuters/Chris Helgren)

breakingnews:

WikiLeaks releases classified US prisoner guidelines

Herald Sun: The whistleblowing website WikiLeaks has released a set of classified US government documents detailing policies on how prisoners in places like Iraq and Cuba are to be treated.

It began by releasing five restricted files from the US Depar

tment of Defense, including the standard operating procedure manual for Camp Delta, Guantanamo Bay. Over the next month it will publish in chronological order more than 100 classified documents.

Photo: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrives to speak from the balcony of Ecuador’s embassy in London, where he is taking refuge, on August 19, 2012. (Reuters/Chris Helgren)
creativemornings:

“How do we make sure that the ideas we’re putting out there are changing things or challenging things?”
Josh Rose, Chief Creative Officer at Weber Shandwick speaking at CreativeMornings/LosAngeles  (*watch the talk)

creativemornings:

“How do we make sure that the ideas we’re putting out there are changing things or challenging things?”

Josh Rose, Chief Creative Officer at Weber Shandwick
speaking at CreativeMornings/LosAngeles (*watch the talk)

(Source: creativemornings)

"Constitutional policing and effective law enforcement go hand-in-hand," Perez said in the report. "Biased policing makes the job of police officers harder, not easier."

Click the link above to learn more.

 

Hello from Dysart Law! 

Hello from Dysart Law!